Haglund deformity – Resection by lateral approach: A case report and review of literature

Vol 41 | Issue 1 | Jan-Jun 2020 | page: 31-33 | Siddhartha Shankar Mohanty, Satya Ranjan Patra, Hemanta Kumar Bamidi, Kishore Chandra Das


Authors: Siddhartha Shankar Mohanty [1], Satya Ranjan Patra [1], Hemanta Kumar Bamidi [1], Kishore Chandra Das [1]

[1] Department of Orthopaedics, SCB Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha, India

Address of Correspondence

Dr. Sudhir Kumar Mahapatra,
SCB Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha, India
E-mail: dr.sudhir.2k@gmail.com


Abstract

Haglund’s syndrome is a mechanical cause of posterior heel pain leading to functional and sporting disability. It is due to a conflict between the achilles tendon and the postero-superior hypertrophied tuberosity of the calcaneus. Physical examination and standard imaging studies are usually sufficient to establish the diagnosis. The treatment is primarily medical; surgery is indicated after failure of functional treatment and it consists of a resection of the posterior-superior bone prominence of the calcaneus with a good results. In some cases tendo-Achilles repair may be needed. We describe a case of symptomatic Haglund’s syndrome that was treated by excision of the mass through lateral approach without tendo-Achilles reconstruction.
Keywords: Haglund’s syndrome, Calcaneus, Surgical excision, Achilles tendon.


References

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How to Cite this Article: Mohanty S S, Patra S R, Bamidi H K, Das K C. | Haglund deformity – resection by lateral approach: a case report and review of literature. | Odisha Journal of Orthopaedics & Trauma | Jan-June 2020; 41(1): 31-33 .

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Characteristic of foot morphology and their relationship to gender, Age, Body mass index and bilateral asymmetry in Indian adults with normal and symptomatic foot

Vol 41 | Issue 1 | Jan-Jun 2020 | page: 7-10 | A C Agrawal, Bikram K Kar, Harshal Sakale, Sandeep, Rakshit J


Authors: A C Agrawal [1], Bikram K Kar [1], Harshal Sakale [1], Sandeep [1], Rakshit J [1]

[1] Department Of Orthopaedics, AIIMS Raipur Chattisgarh, India.

Address of Correspondence

Dr. Rakshit J,
AIIMS Raipur Chattisgarh, India.
E-mail: jgrakshit@gmail.com


Abstract

Introduction: The human foot, the foundation for bipedal locomotion, is a complex adaptation that evolved through extensive remodelling of the hind appendage of our arboreal primate forebears (Susman 1983).Different characteristics of foot morphology are commonly accompanied by altering lower extremity biomechanical characteristics and foot function. Clarifying what factors affect foot morphology is helpful in understanding the basis of foot deformity and foot dysfunction. As the direction of change in foot morphology caused by ageing can be assumed theoretically, it should be possible to judge whether ageing or secular changes are more important in determining the foot morphology of Indian adults.
Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate characteristics of foot morphology and whether related factors such as gender, age, body mass index (BMI) and bilateral asymmetry have an impact on foot morphology.
Material and Methodology and Implications: The present study is planned in the Department of Orthopaedics, AIIMS Raipur CG. One hundred asymptomatic adults were included in this cross-sectional study. Participants will be categorised by gender, age, BMI and left and right foot respectively to compare foot morphology differences. The characteristics of foot morphology are measured by taking measurements, foot prints on graph paper, photographs Fig 1. All measurements were done by one person to avoid error that could be caused by individual differences or any discomfort. The parameters obtained from the participants include: age, gender, foot length, foot breadth and foot height of the subjects
Result: Symptomatic foot population were overweight compared to asymptomatic population and hence forth had a higher BMI .Mean arch height was lower with mean of 3.5224 in symptomatic foot compared to asyptomatic foot that was 3.9663.Mean arch height index in right foot – weight bearing was 0.2492 compared to non weight bearing foot that was 0.2312
Conclusion: Using arch index values obtained from imprint over paper to classify foot type as high arched ,normal , low arched ,based on defined ranges gives an idea about the cause of foot pathology and also the socio- demographical parameters responsible for foot morphology.
Keywords: Foot Morphology, Symptomatic foot, BMI.


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How to Cite this Article: Agrawal A C, Bikram K K, Sakale H, Sandeep, Rakshit. | Characteristic of foot morphology and their relationship to gender, Age, Body mass index and bilateral asymmetry in Indian adults with normal and symptomatic foot. | Odisha Journal of Orthopaedics & Trauma | Jan-June 2020; 41(1): 7-10.  

(Abstract) (Full Text HTML)      (Download PDF)


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